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The Republic

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue, written by Plato around 380 BC, concerning the definition of justice, the order and character of the just city-state and the just man—for this reason, ancient readers used the name On Justice as an alternative title (not to be confused with the spurious dialogue also titled On Justice). The dramatic date of the dialogue has been much debated and though it might have taken place some time during the Peloponnesian War, "there would be jarring anachronisms if any of the candidate specific dates between 432 and 404 were assigned"

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue, written by Plato around 380 BC, concerning the definition of justice, the order and character of the just city-state and the just man—for this reason, ancient readers used the name On Justice as an ...

The Republic of Plato

Books I. V., With Introduction and Notes (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from The Republic of Plato: Books I. V., With Introduction and Notes In the case of the Republic, a solitary edition by a Bachelor of Arts of Trinity College, Cambridge, Edmund Massey, in 1713, interrupts this long neglect. Unfortunately its date is its only interest. It is a pity that a far more competent and famous Cantabrigian did not undertake the task in which Massey failed. The poet Gray, equally at home in art and philosophy, perhaps the most learned man in Europe of his time, and the nicest critic, a little later than Massey, compiled for his own use a body of notes on Plato, which, in their matter, and still more their method, show what he might have done as a professed scholar, and cause us to regret that we have not an edition of the Republic by the author of the Elegy. As it was, no new commentary on the Republic appeared in Europe until the early years of our own century, when Ast published his three successive editions, modifying and advancing himself in the last, by aid of the critical labours of Bekker. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

The Laws of Plato

A dialogue between a foreign philosopher and a powerful statesman outline Plato's reflections on the family, the status of women, property rights, and criminal law

A dialogue between a foreign philosopher and a powerful statesman outline Plato's reflections on the family, the status of women, property rights, and criminal law

Aspects of Modern Logic

It is common to consider an area of science as a system of real or sup posed truths which not only continuously extends itself, but also needs periodical revision and therefore tests the inventive capacity of each generation of scholars anew. It sounds highly implausible that a science at one time would be completed, that at that point within its scope there would be no problems left to solve. Indeed, the solution of a scientific problem inevitably raises new questions, so that our eagerness for knowledge will never find lasting satisfaction. Nevertheless there is one science which seems to form an exception to this rule, formal logic, the theory of rigorous argumentation. It seems to have reached the ideal endpoint of every scientific aspiration already very shortly after its inception; using the work of some predecessors, Aristotle, or so it is at least assumed by many, has brought this branch of science once and for all to a conclusion. Of course this doesn't sound that implausible. We apparently know what rigorous argumentation is; otherwise various sciences, in particular pure mathematics, would be completely impossible. And if we know what rigorous argumentation is, then it cannot be difficult to trace once and for all the rules which govern it. The unique subject of formal logic would therefore entail that this science, in variance with the rule which holds for all other sciences, has been able to reach completion at a certain point in history.

Our algorithm A3 evidently determines the set N3 or N1–N2 of all the sequences
of signs which belong to N1 but not to N2. EXAMPLE 4. Let the algorithm A4 be
characterized by: 1. the alphabet {a, b}; 2. the axiom ab; 3. the production u=>aub
. This algorithm determines the set N4 of those sequences of signs which consist
of a certain number of a's followed by an equal number of b's. EXAMPLE 5. Let
the algorithm. As be characterized by: 1. the alphabet {a, b}; 2. the axioms aa and
bb ...

Maps of the Mind

Presents and assesses more than fifty concepts of how the mind works and attempts to assimilate them into an overall theory

Presents and assesses more than fifty concepts of how the mind works and attempts to assimilate them into an overall theory