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An Introduction to Discrete Mathematics

Intended for a one-term course in discrete mathematics, to prepare freshmen and sophomores for further work in computer science as well as mathematics. Sets, proof techniques, logic, combinatorics, and graph theory are covered in concise form. All topics are motivated by concrete examples, often emphasizing the interplay between computer science and mathematics. Examples also illustrate all definitions. Applications and references cover a wide variety of realistic situations. Coverage of mathematical induction includes the stroung form of induction, and new sections have been added on nonhomogeneous recurrence relations and the essentials of probability.

Intended for a one-term course in discrete mathematics, to prepare freshmen and sophomores for further work in computer science as well as mathematics.

Current approaches to the teaching of grammar in ESL

CURRENT APPROACHES TO THE TEACHING OF GRAMMAR IN ESL The
teaching of English as a second language has been in a state of flux for several
years, primarily because the audiolingual method of language teaching has
undergone a critical reevaluation fostered by the advocates of a more "cognitive"
approach. In many educational centers there has been a clear and conscious
movement away from the traditional techniques of mimicry and choral response
toward an ...

An Ecological Perspective on Human Communication Theory

AN ECOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON HUMAN COMMUNICATION THEORY introduces communication students to both research and theory at an undergraduate level and avoids extensive discussion of philosophical and epistemological issues. The ecological/interdisciplinary approach synthesizes information from diverse fields, including anthropology, biology, linguistics, psychology, and sociology. A student manual at the back of the book includes activities, discussion questions, recommended readings, and videos.

This unit is devoted to explaining the ecology of communication, the evolutionary
prehistory of communication, the history of communication technologies, and the
history of the study of communication processes and patterns. In Chapters 1 and
2 our concern is with placing communication within ecological boundaries,
highlighting the role of communication in our survival as a species, and
discussing the role of communication in our everyday lives. Further, we define
communication ...

Sherlock Holmes, the published apocrypha

Contributions by J. M. Barrie, William Gillette, and Arthur Conan Doyle himself revive the great detective once more in this delightful collection of plays and parodies never before published as a group

Contributions by J. M. Barrie, William Gillette, and Arthur Conan Doyle himself revive the great detective once more in this delightful collection of plays and parodies never before published as a group

The Blue Tower

The work of this “eminent, still-wild spirit of Central Europe” (Publishers Weekly) continues to electrify. In The Blue Tower, language is remade with tenderness and abandon: “Rommel was kissing heaven’s dainty hands and yet / from his airplane above the Sahara my uncle / Rafko Perhauc still blew him to bits.” There is an effervescence and a sense of freedom to Tomaž Salamun’s poetry that has made him an inspiration to successive generations of American poets, “a poetic bridge between old European roots and the American adventure” (Associated Press). Trivial and monumental, beautiful and grotesque, healing, ferocious, mad: The Blue Tower is an essential volume.

The goldfinch sails. The goldfinch sings. Where are you, Eugenijus? Racing
across, opening a hollow with your fingernails. You the pain of the contour, me
that of the train. Linda Bierds drives a car that comes from the Tatras. The condor
ripens the bird. My trousers smell like gasoline. Do you see the pool? Do you see
the pool? Do you see the angel's elbow? It led me to those cliffs arrayed like
Vikings. Zebras have scraped eyes. Ibrahim, Drago and Miklavž are great guys.
Iodine boils ...

Capitol Men

The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen

Reconstruction was a time of idealism and sweeping change, as the victorious Union created citizenship rights for the freed slaves and granted the vote to black men. Sixteen black Southerners, elected to the U.S. Congress, arrived in Washington to advocate reforms such as public education, equal rights, land distribution, and the suppression of the Ku Klux Klan. But these men faced astounding odds. They were belittled as corrupt and inadequate by their white political opponents, who used legislative trickery, libel, bribery, and the brutal intimidation of their constituents to rob them of their base of support. Despite their status as congressmen, they were made to endure the worst humiliations of racial prejudice. And they have been largely forgotten—often neglected or maligned by standard histories of the period. In this beautifully written book, Philip Dray reclaims their story. Drawing on archival documents, contemporary news accounts, and congressional records, he shows how the efforts of black Americans revealed their political perceptiveness and readiness to serve as voters, citizens, and elected officials. We meet men like the war hero Robert Smalls of South Carolina (who had stolen a Confederate vessel and delivered it to the Union navy), Robert Brown Elliott (who bested the former vice president of the Confederacy in a stormy debate on the House floor), and the distinguished former slave Blanche K. Bruce (who was said to possess “the manners of a Chesterfield”). As Dray demonstrates, these men were eloquent, creative, and often effective representatives who, as support for Reconstruction faded, were undone by the forces of Southern reaction and Northern indifference. In a grand narrative that traces the promising yet tragic arc of Reconstruction, Dray follows these black representatives’ struggles, from the Emancipation Proclamation to the onset of Jim Crow, as they fought for social justice and helped realize the promise of a new nation.

Dunn slipped into unconsciousness, and Packard was summoned. Seeing his
friend's desperate situation, he called in another physician, Dr. Scott, who
declared that Dunn was suffering from congestion of the brain and lungs brought
about by excessive vomiting. Other leading physicians of New Orleans arrived,
including Dr. Warren Stone, a local medical pioneer, and Dr. Louis Roudanez, a
Paris- educated Creole physician, but they ventured no new diagnosis and ex-
pressed ...