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The Challenge of American History

In The Challenge of American History, Louis Masur brings together a sampling of recent scholarship to determine the key issues preoccupying historians of American history and to contemplate the discipline's direction for the future. The fifteen summary essays included in this volume allow professional historians, history teachers, and students to grasp in a convenient and accessible form what historians have been writing about.

... Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218-4363 www.press.jhu.edu Library of
Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data will be found at the end of this book. A
catalog record for this book is available from the British Library. ISBN 0-8018-
6222-1 (pbk ...

Introduction to Differential Equations Using Sage

David Joyner and Marshall Hampton’s lucid textbook explains differential equations using the free and open-source mathematical software Sage. Since its release in 2005, Sage has acquired a substantial following among mathematicians, but its first user was Joyner, who is credited with helping famed mathematician William Stein turn the program into a usable and popular choice. Introduction to Differential Equations Using Sage extends Stein's work by creating a classroom tool that allows both differential equations and Sage to be taught concurrently. It’s a creative and forward-thinking approach to math instruction. Topics include: • First-Order Differential Equations • Incorporation of Newtonian Mechanics• Second-Order Differential Equations• The Annihilator Method• Using Linear Algebra with Differential Equations• Nonlinear Systems• Partial Differential Equations• Romeo and Juliet

Introduction to Differential Equations Using Sage extends Stein's work by creating a classroom tool that allows both differential equations and Sage to be taught concurrently.

Islam and the English Enlightenment, 1670–1840

A corrective addendum to Edward Said’s Orientalism, this book examines how sympathetic representations of Islam contributed significantly to Protestant Britain’s national and imperial identity in the eighteenth century. Taking a historical view, Humberto Garcia combines a rereading of eighteenth-century and Romantic-era British literature with original research on Anglo-Islamic relations. He finds that far from being considered foreign by the era’s thinkers, Islamic republicanism played a defining role in Radical Enlightenment debates, most significantly during the Glorious Revolution, French Revolution, and other moments of acute constitutional crisis, as well as in national and political debates about England and its overseas empire. Garcia shows that writers such as Edmund Burke, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Southey, and Percy and Mary Shelley not only were influenced by international events in the Muslim world but also saw in that world and its history a viable path to interrogate, contest, and redefine British concepts of liberty. This deft exploration of the forgotten moment in early modern history when intercultural exchange between the Muslim world and Christian West was common resituates English literary and intellectual history in the wider context of the global eighteenth century. The direct challenge it poses to the idea of an exclusionary Judeo-Christian Enlightenment serves as an important revision to post-9/11 narratives about a historical clash between Western democratic values and Islam.

In the wilderness of Lebanon, these nomadic people established an egalitarian
commune. Lacking magistrates and priests, their Islamic republic practices equal
labor and mutual love, and, “acknowledging no laws but those of ...

The Republic Reborn

War and the Making of Liberal America, 1790-1820

Though evidence is fragmentary and interpretation is somewhat speculative, as
both must be in this type of inquiry, the lives and words of Charles Brockden
Brown, Alfred Brunson, and John Quincy Adams reveal some of the private
traumas of early liberal individualism in America. In the experiences, reflections,
confessions, and actions of these Jeffersonian sympathizers2" can be seen the
psychological dramas involving Fathers and Sons, authority and repression, and
identity and ...

Ulysses

With characteristic flair, Kenner explores the ways James Joyce teaches us to read his novel, moving from the simple to the complex, from the familiar to the strange and new, from the norms of the 19th-century novel to the open forms of modernism.

With characteristic flair, Kenner explores the ways James Joyce teaches us to read his novel, moving from the simple to the complex, from the familiar to the strange and new, from the norms of the 19th-century novel to the open forms of ...

A History of Medicine in the Early U.S. Navy

Langley's book traces the evolution of medical practice in the U.S. Navy fromthe building of the first frigates in 1794 to the establishment of the Bureauof Medicine and Surgery in 1842.

Langley's book traces the evolution of medical practice in the U.S. Navy fromthe building of the first frigates in 1794 to the establishment of the Bureauof Medicine and Surgery in 1842.

The Latin Sexual Vocabulary

Cassius Felix uses only matrix (25 times). The Latin translation of Hippocr. Aer.
has matrix 3 times (rendering both p/fp-pa and uorepa; for the former translated
see 21, p. 41.7, and for the latter, see 7, p. 13.15). Vterus outnumbers matrix (4 ...

On Our Minds

How Evolutionary Psychology Is Reshaping the Nature versus Nurture Debate

There is no question more fundamental to human existence than that posed by the nature-versus-nurture debate. For much of the past century, it was widely believed that there was no essential human nature and that people could be educated or socialized to thrive in almost any imaginable culture. Today, that orthodoxy is being directly and forcefully challenged by a new science of the mind: evolutionary psychology. Like the theory of evolution itself, the implications of evolutionary psychology are provocative and unsettling. Rather than viewing the human mind as a mysterious black box or a blank slate, evolutionary psychologists see it as a physical organ that has evolved to process certain types of information in certain ways that enables us to thrive only in certain types of cultures. In On Our Minds, Eric M. Gander examines all sides of the public debate between evolutionary psychologists and their critics. Paying particularly close attention to the popular science writings of Steven Pinker, Edward O. Wilson, Richard Dawkins, and Stephen Jay Gould, Gander traces the history of the controversy, succinctly summarizes the claims and theories of the evolutionary psychologists, dissects the various arguments deployed by each side, and considers in detail the far-reaching ramifications—social, cultural, and political—of this debate. Gander's lucid and highly readable account concludes that evolutionary psychology now holds the potential to answer our oldest and most profound moral and philosophical questions, fundamentally changing our self–perception as a species. -- Boguslaw Pawlowski

appeared, Jensen was a more controversial figure in the field of intelligence
research than Herrnstein himself. Indeed, the first mention we get of Jensen in
Herrnstein's article comes by way of a reference to Jensen's infamous 1969
article ...